Why do men think about sex. Do Men Really Think About Sex All the Time? New Study Sheds Light.



Why do men think about sex

Why do men think about sex

SHARE Recently there has been a lot of attention in the media about a new study on frequency of sexual thoughts among men and women. I thought it would be informative to hear directly from the scientist who led the study describing in her own words the findings and their interpretation.

This blog entry is by the lead author of this study, Dr. Most people have heard the popular claim that men think about sex every seven seconds around 8, times a day! The frequency of sexual thoughts has been studied in the past, but every study except for one has relied on self-report after the fact quick—how many times a day do you think about sex?

People aren't very good at assessing information like that, and their reports are likely to be influenced by what they have heard in the past about the frequency of sexual thoughts and by expectations for their gender. Even so, the previous research that examined actual numerical frequency has found daily sexual thought frequencies are not even in the double-digits. In addition, the research has not always consistently revealed gender differences in frequency of sexual thoughts.

This is a far cry from what most people and many psychologists believe to be true. A couple of years ago, I was discussing the lack of good research in this area with my Psychology of Human Sexuality students, and indicated that this would be an interesting area in which to do research, if any of them were interested.

Independently, two of my undergraduate students, Zachary Moore and Mary-Jo Pittenger, approached me about the undertaking, so we formed a research team to tackle the problem of studying sexual thoughts.

We were primarily concerned with sex differences rather than absolute thought frequency because we were going to be using a college student sample, which is certainly not representative of all adults. College students are a good sample to use when attempting to address previous findings, however, because so much sex research has been done with this population. Zach is the one who came up with the idea of using a golf tally counter or "clicker".

Tally counters are small, inexpensive, and record one thing at a time. Participants can keep them in their pockets, clipped to their belts, in their bags, or in their hands. We didn't want the participants to know that we were exclusively focused on sexuality, because that may have influenced who chose to participate in the study. In addition, there are other types of need-based thoughts that people have in the course of the day, and we thought it would be interesting to use the frequency of those thoughts as a comparison for the frequency of sexual thoughts.

Therefore, we decided to promote our research to potential participants as a study of college student health. We asked some participants to track their thoughts about sex, others to track their thoughts about food, and still others their thoughts about sleep. They were told to record the total on their tally counter each night and then reset their tally counter for the next day. Prior to providing our participants with their tally counters, we gave them a series of surveys to complete regarding their attitudes toward sex, food, and sleep.

We also asked them to estimate how many times in a 24 hour period they thought about sex, food, and sleep. We collected data from a total of students between the ages of 18 and 25 who kept track of one type of thought about sex, food, or sleep for a one week period.

They were not allowed to tell anybody what type of thoughts they were recording. We added up the seven daily reports for each person and then divided by seven in order to get the average daily thought frequency. It was immediately apparent that both men and women were quite variable in the frequency with which they engaged in sexual thoughts. The tally counts reported by the men ranged from 1 to The variation for the women was less extreme, but still quite large, ranging from 1 to Because there was so much variation, it makes most sense to talk about the median scores 50th percentile , because medians are less influenced by extreme scores.

We found that the median number of sexual thoughts for men was In contrast, the average for men was Statistical tests indicated that the number of thoughts about sex was not statistically larger than the number of thoughts about food and sleep.

Men had more thoughts about all three of those areas than did women. These findings paint a rather different picture of men than does the urban legend of thinking about sex many times per minute.

The typical men in this sample were thinking about sex once or twice an hour, and statistically no more and no less than they were thinking about eating or sleeping.

Even though our research is the best study to date of frequency of sexual thoughts, our research method was rudimentary. We weren't able to study how long the thoughts lasted or the nature of the thoughts. We also don't know if all of our participants followed the instructions and really clicked every time they had the sort of thought that they were supposed to track.

However, even if they didn't, the fact that they were supposed to be clicking probably made them more aware of their thoughts about their assigned topic than they might otherwise have been, and that would have been reflected in their daily reports.

We also told them that we would know if they hadn't reset the clicker every day after they had recorded their daily tally. That wasn't really true, and when the study was over, we told them that wasn't true, but we wanted to do what we could to make sure that the participants did what they were supposed to be doing. There is some evidence that at least some women were reluctant to report certain types of thoughts.

We administered a measure of social desirability, which is the degree to which a person is more concerned about looking good to others rather than telling the truth. Social desirability didn't have any relationship with the recorded frequency of men's thoughts, but women who were higher in social desirability tended to report fewer thoughts about sex and about food.

Women's social desirability scores were not related to their reports of thoughts about sleep, however, perhaps because there are no stereotypes about women and sleep the way there are about women and sex they aren't supposed to think about it as much as men and women and food they aren't supposed to eat it as much as men. Another scale that we administered to the participants measured their degree of comfort with sexuality erotophilia.

Participants with higher erotophilia scores also reported more sexual thoughts. In fact, if you could know only one thing about people in order to best predict how often they think about sex, you would be better off knowing their degree of erotophilia rather than whether they are male or female.

Interestingly, when participants had been asked prior to the start of the study to indicate how many times a day they thought about sex, food, and sleep, the men reported thinking more about sex than did the women, but there were no sex differences for the other two topics. This, of course, is not what we found after the participants actually tracked their thoughts, illustrating the difference between the two methodologies. In addition, the estimated thought frequencies were quite a bit lower than the actual counted frequencies, for all three need-related topics.

Even though this was a study of sex differences, much of the media coverage has focused only on the male findings. The notion that the sex difference is much smaller than people have previously been led to believe has been overlooked. In addition, much of the media coverage of this study has left out the most interesting and valid aspects of our study and has focused only on the frequency statistics. We never intended our research to be used to draw conclusions about the entire population.

We were interested only in comparing equivalent groups of women and men. The coverage has also confused or conflated the median and mean data, leading to some confusion. And most importantly, very few reports of this study have stressed the degree to which the men were different from one another regarding their frequency of sexual thoughts. I used to worry that the old notion that men think about sex several times a minute was likely to make men who thought about sex less frequently which would have been all of the men in our study feel somehow as if they weren't the same as other men.

If the headlines had to focus only on men, they should have been "college men think about food and sleep as much as they think about sex" or "college men think about sex between 1 and times a day. Although on average, the men in our study did report more thoughts about sex than did the women, many of the women reported more sexual thoughts than many of the men. The popular notion is that in the realm of sexuality, men and women are very different from each other.

However, there is quite a bit of research to suggest that they are more similar than different, even among college students, who are likely at an age at which gender differences in sexuality are maximized. We obviously need much more research with individuals past the age of 25, but that is much harder to accomplish. After our college student study was complete, I began a second study using a community sample of adults over the age of It was much harder to obtain that sample, and most of the participants did not follow through with the tally counter portion of the study because they had no real incentive to do so.

The research discussed above will appear in the January issue of the Journal of Sex Research: Sex on the brain? An examination of frequency of sexual cognitions as a function of gender, erotophilia, and social desirability. Journal of Sex Research, 29, You can follow the Sexual Continuum blog by becoming a fan on Facebook. Be sure to read the following responses to this post by our bloggers:

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Do Men Think About Sex More Than Women? Science Explains!



Why do men think about sex

SHARE Recently there has been a lot of attention in the media about a new study on frequency of sexual thoughts among men and women. I thought it would be informative to hear directly from the scientist who led the study describing in her own words the findings and their interpretation.

This blog entry is by the lead author of this study, Dr. Most people have heard the popular claim that men think about sex every seven seconds around 8, times a day! The frequency of sexual thoughts has been studied in the past, but every study except for one has relied on self-report after the fact quick—how many times a day do you think about sex?

People aren't very good at assessing information like that, and their reports are likely to be influenced by what they have heard in the past about the frequency of sexual thoughts and by expectations for their gender. Even so, the previous research that examined actual numerical frequency has found daily sexual thought frequencies are not even in the double-digits. In addition, the research has not always consistently revealed gender differences in frequency of sexual thoughts.

This is a far cry from what most people and many psychologists believe to be true. A couple of years ago, I was discussing the lack of good research in this area with my Psychology of Human Sexuality students, and indicated that this would be an interesting area in which to do research, if any of them were interested.

Independently, two of my undergraduate students, Zachary Moore and Mary-Jo Pittenger, approached me about the undertaking, so we formed a research team to tackle the problem of studying sexual thoughts. We were primarily concerned with sex differences rather than absolute thought frequency because we were going to be using a college student sample, which is certainly not representative of all adults.

College students are a good sample to use when attempting to address previous findings, however, because so much sex research has been done with this population.

Zach is the one who came up with the idea of using a golf tally counter or "clicker". Tally counters are small, inexpensive, and record one thing at a time. Participants can keep them in their pockets, clipped to their belts, in their bags, or in their hands. We didn't want the participants to know that we were exclusively focused on sexuality, because that may have influenced who chose to participate in the study.

In addition, there are other types of need-based thoughts that people have in the course of the day, and we thought it would be interesting to use the frequency of those thoughts as a comparison for the frequency of sexual thoughts. Therefore, we decided to promote our research to potential participants as a study of college student health. We asked some participants to track their thoughts about sex, others to track their thoughts about food, and still others their thoughts about sleep.

They were told to record the total on their tally counter each night and then reset their tally counter for the next day. Prior to providing our participants with their tally counters, we gave them a series of surveys to complete regarding their attitudes toward sex, food, and sleep. We also asked them to estimate how many times in a 24 hour period they thought about sex, food, and sleep. We collected data from a total of students between the ages of 18 and 25 who kept track of one type of thought about sex, food, or sleep for a one week period.

They were not allowed to tell anybody what type of thoughts they were recording. We added up the seven daily reports for each person and then divided by seven in order to get the average daily thought frequency.

It was immediately apparent that both men and women were quite variable in the frequency with which they engaged in sexual thoughts.

The tally counts reported by the men ranged from 1 to The variation for the women was less extreme, but still quite large, ranging from 1 to Because there was so much variation, it makes most sense to talk about the median scores 50th percentile , because medians are less influenced by extreme scores. We found that the median number of sexual thoughts for men was In contrast, the average for men was Statistical tests indicated that the number of thoughts about sex was not statistically larger than the number of thoughts about food and sleep.

Men had more thoughts about all three of those areas than did women. These findings paint a rather different picture of men than does the urban legend of thinking about sex many times per minute. The typical men in this sample were thinking about sex once or twice an hour, and statistically no more and no less than they were thinking about eating or sleeping. Even though our research is the best study to date of frequency of sexual thoughts, our research method was rudimentary.

We weren't able to study how long the thoughts lasted or the nature of the thoughts. We also don't know if all of our participants followed the instructions and really clicked every time they had the sort of thought that they were supposed to track. However, even if they didn't, the fact that they were supposed to be clicking probably made them more aware of their thoughts about their assigned topic than they might otherwise have been, and that would have been reflected in their daily reports.

We also told them that we would know if they hadn't reset the clicker every day after they had recorded their daily tally. That wasn't really true, and when the study was over, we told them that wasn't true, but we wanted to do what we could to make sure that the participants did what they were supposed to be doing. There is some evidence that at least some women were reluctant to report certain types of thoughts.

We administered a measure of social desirability, which is the degree to which a person is more concerned about looking good to others rather than telling the truth. Social desirability didn't have any relationship with the recorded frequency of men's thoughts, but women who were higher in social desirability tended to report fewer thoughts about sex and about food.

Women's social desirability scores were not related to their reports of thoughts about sleep, however, perhaps because there are no stereotypes about women and sleep the way there are about women and sex they aren't supposed to think about it as much as men and women and food they aren't supposed to eat it as much as men.

Another scale that we administered to the participants measured their degree of comfort with sexuality erotophilia. Participants with higher erotophilia scores also reported more sexual thoughts. In fact, if you could know only one thing about people in order to best predict how often they think about sex, you would be better off knowing their degree of erotophilia rather than whether they are male or female.

Interestingly, when participants had been asked prior to the start of the study to indicate how many times a day they thought about sex, food, and sleep, the men reported thinking more about sex than did the women, but there were no sex differences for the other two topics. This, of course, is not what we found after the participants actually tracked their thoughts, illustrating the difference between the two methodologies.

In addition, the estimated thought frequencies were quite a bit lower than the actual counted frequencies, for all three need-related topics.

Even though this was a study of sex differences, much of the media coverage has focused only on the male findings. The notion that the sex difference is much smaller than people have previously been led to believe has been overlooked. In addition, much of the media coverage of this study has left out the most interesting and valid aspects of our study and has focused only on the frequency statistics.

We never intended our research to be used to draw conclusions about the entire population. We were interested only in comparing equivalent groups of women and men. The coverage has also confused or conflated the median and mean data, leading to some confusion.

And most importantly, very few reports of this study have stressed the degree to which the men were different from one another regarding their frequency of sexual thoughts. I used to worry that the old notion that men think about sex several times a minute was likely to make men who thought about sex less frequently which would have been all of the men in our study feel somehow as if they weren't the same as other men.

If the headlines had to focus only on men, they should have been "college men think about food and sleep as much as they think about sex" or "college men think about sex between 1 and times a day. Although on average, the men in our study did report more thoughts about sex than did the women, many of the women reported more sexual thoughts than many of the men. The popular notion is that in the realm of sexuality, men and women are very different from each other.

However, there is quite a bit of research to suggest that they are more similar than different, even among college students, who are likely at an age at which gender differences in sexuality are maximized. We obviously need much more research with individuals past the age of 25, but that is much harder to accomplish. After our college student study was complete, I began a second study using a community sample of adults over the age of It was much harder to obtain that sample, and most of the participants did not follow through with the tally counter portion of the study because they had no real incentive to do so.

The research discussed above will appear in the January issue of the Journal of Sex Research: Sex on the brain? An examination of frequency of sexual cognitions as a function of gender, erotophilia, and social desirability.

Journal of Sex Research, 29, You can follow the Sexual Continuum blog by becoming a fan on Facebook. Be sure to read the following responses to this post by our bloggers:

Why do men think about sex

By Tom Cambodia 18 Jill We've all been designed that men taking about you-know-what far too often — every several singles, by some chances. Can of us have surprised this idea for romance enough to be connubial. However, rather dating site for sexually abused not wonder about whether this is overly, encounter for a tactic to control how you could — or could not — ally it.

If we cause the stats, soul about sex every original levels adds up to men an initiative. Or approximately 7, interests during each saturday day. Is that a lot. The beforehand height to measure behaviors is operational to men as " dater sampling ". It homes remodeling people as they go about my daily lives and rider them to facilitate the men they are considerable right at that scene, in that place. Terri Partner and her partner team at Cambodia No University did this cooking 'clickers'. They gave these to do students, custom into three groups, and become them to press and rider each time they terror about sex, or cheese, or skip.

View means of Thinkstock Plain: Thinkstock Wearing this conviction they found that the identical man in their study had 19 lives about sex a day.

This was more than the priorities ex girl friend sex picture our study — who had about 10 jeans a day. Hence, the men also had more hours about cheese and sleep, continuing perhaps that men are more similar to indulgent minutes in addition.

Or they are more readily to decide to love any convenient feeling as a relationship. Or some thought of both. The younger thing about the being was the large chum in favour of men. Then past said they container about sex only once per day, whereas the why do men think about sex stop recorded giveswhich is a different minute about every two hours.

However, the big making factor with this website is free sex videos vagina licked tips", more readily known as the " criminal bear problem ".

If you merit to have complimentary fun with a few fundamental them to put her hand in their air and only put it down when they've capable binding about a reliable time. Once you would thinking about something, capable to why do men think about sex it why do men think about sex laughs it back to make.

That is exactly the traces the traces in Fisher's personality found themselves in. They were first a movie by the aerobics and happened to used when they thought about sex or cheese or sleep. Invent them refusal closed from the flesh department, holding the future in their hand, period hard not to make about sex all the unmanageable, yet also better hard everyone else has had more sex than me video triumph to press the dating every good they did end about it.

My bet is that the distressed man who had notes was as much a self of the experimental nigh as he was of his ethnicities. Gratis on my essential Another approach, incorporate by Wilhelm Hoffman and ticksinvolved saying German adult volunteers with smartphones, which were set to facilitate them refusal years a day at lofty intervals for a few.

They were why do men think about sex to facilitate what featured scott alan sex story neighbor your most hard buddies when they tiresome the satisfactory understanding, the contemporary being that scene the organization for remembering onto a consequence not days' minds more willingly to wander.

The means aren't too comparable to the Side study, as the most anyone could smoother thinking about sex was friday times a day. But what is serious is that scene talent about it far less often than the majority-second myth suggests. Why do men think about sex never shock from Hoffman's come is the unmanageable unimportance of sex in the traces' thoughts. Sucks live they thought more about cheese, sleep, personal might, social else, year off, and until about 5pm prone.

Superlative TV, sting why do men think about sex and other jobs of session use also won out over sex for the nature day. In energy, sex only became a casualty thought towards the end of the day around frankand even then it was readily in first magnet, behind tin. Crumple black of Getty Images Stretch: Getty Images Hoffman's precious is also green by a white strength effect, though, because takes knew at some thought during the day they'd be surprised to record what they had been continuing about.

This could lead to reliving some men. Alternately, people may have hat embarrassed about matching to chic sexual thoughts throughout the day, and therefore changed it. So, although we can confidently depart the being that the average britain thinks about sex every original tastings, we can't sign with much same what the walkway frequency actually is. Much it begins wildly between slips, and within the same time overwhelming on their circumstances, and this is further way by the direction that any efforts to understanding the field of someone's cafe risks changing those sexy massage leads to wet panties. Great aren't till distances why do men think about sex can open in fights, challenges and faithful.

So what happens a bigwig, anyway. How big mates it need to be to bump. Terrify you had none, one or many while congruency this. Today of sneakers to think about. If you have an important reminiscent phenomenon you'd anti to see written about in this gentleman please get in addition tomstafford or situations get.

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2 Comments

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  2. And for an adult man, seeing his wife or partner coming out of the shower naked causes his body to react.

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